Featured Stories

Other Pamplin Media Group sites

Rush Hour 2 review by Dhyana Kearly

If you happen to arrive at the movie theater a tad bit early and find yourself waiting in line for the people to file out of the earlier showing of Rush Hour 2 _ you'll undoubtedly go into this film thinking it's got to be one of the best Jackie Chan films ever.
   That's because everyone filing out of the theater will be smiling to themselves or laughing out loud as they shake their heads in amusement.
   But, you'll have the wrong impression. These people are simply enjoying what could easily be called the funniest parts of Rush Hour 2, the outtakes. The rest of the film is a bust.
   Rush Hour 2 takes off right where Rush Hour left off. Here Chief Inspector Lee (Jackie Chan) of the Hong Kong Police and LAPD detective James Carter (Chris Tucker) are in Hong Kong on what Carter thinks is a vacation. But Lee is far too busy following up on crime cases to let the pair relax.
   Shortly into the film a bomb explodes in the American Embassy, killing two U.S. customs agents who were deep into investigating a counterfeiting ring.
   The Hong Kong police suspect that Triad crime lord Ricky Tan is the instigator. Inspector Lee takes the assignment even though Carter would much rather be chasing the chicks.
   There's something terribly appealing about Jackie Chan. No matter what film he is in, he draws the camera's attention and comes across as genuine, innocent and hard working.
   Even though Tucker would be much more appealing if he kept his mouth shut, nothing stops him from making loud, obnoxious comments about everything.
   Alas, the appeal for Chan isn't enough to carry this sorry film. Surely we'd much rather be watching Chan develop his character and work the fight scenes he's so famous for, but these guys opted to give us way too much Tucker and not enough Chan.
   In the original Rush Hour, even though Tucker was a bit obnoxious, he wasn't nearly as obnoxious as he is in this rendition. And, even though obnoxious is part of the Carter character, the directors simply went too far.
   In fact, Tucker's character is so unappealing it left me wondering why Inspector Lee was even hanging out with the guy.
   In the first film the friendship was allowed to develop between Carter and Lee. There were moments of genuine conversation and less wise cracking, making it possible to believe that the two could actually be friends.
   In Rush Hour 2, the bonds that tie these two together are so obscure that you'll find yourself wishing that Jackie Chan would just give in and put Chris Tucker on the next flight back to LA, alone. And, please let's not pencil him in again for Rush Hour 3!